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The photoreaction of active-site-methylated bacteriorhodopsin: an investigation using static and time-resolved infrared difference spectroscopy

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Siebert,  Friedrich
Transport Proteins Group, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;
Institut für Biophysik und Strahlenbiologie, Albert-Ludwig-Universität Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau, Federal Republic of Germany;

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Citation

Kräutle, R., Gärtner, W., Ganter, U. M., Longstaff, C., Rando, R. R., & Siebert, F. (1990). The photoreaction of active-site-methylated bacteriorhodopsin: an investigation using static and time-resolved infrared difference spectroscopy. Biochemistry, 29(16), 3915-3923. doi:10.1021/bi00468a018.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-A536-1
Abstract
The photoreaction of active-site-methylated, permethylated bacteriorhodopsin has been investigated by static and time-resolved UV-vis and infrared difference spectroscopy. Additional information on the isomeric composition of the initial state and of photoproducts was obtained by retinal extraction and subsequent HPLC analysis. The data show that the dark-adapted state contains only all-trans-retinal. Prolonged illumination produces a metastable state which contains essentially only 9-cis-retinal and which decays back to the dark-adapted initial state within 8 h. The time-resolved infrared difference spectra clearly demonstrate that laser flash excitation produces an intermediate that has all the characteristics of the L intermediate. It is demonstrated that the methyl group at the Schiff base nitrogen introduces a steric hindrance with the protein which inhibits a photoreaction at 80 K, but which allows the generation of an L-like intermediate at room temperature and 173 K