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Advances in increment coring system for large tropical trees with high wood densities

MPS-Authors
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Caetano Andrade,  Victor Lery
Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Roberts,  Patrick
Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Caetano Andrade, V. L., Schöngart, J., Ayala, W. E., Melinski, R. D., Silva, F., Dobrindt, R., et al. (2021). Advances in increment coring system for large tropical trees with high wood densities. Dendrochronologia, 125860. doi:10.1016/j.dendro.2021.125860.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-C0B0-7
Abstract
Incremental coring of trees is the key method used in non-destructive dendrochronological sampling. Despite the advances in developing such methods, the sampling of large, high-density trees still poses a challenge in remote tropical forests. Manually operated incremental drills, while easy to transport across difficult terrain, limit sample size and can often get damaged in the sampling process, especially when trees have wood densities above 0.8 g/cm³. Here, we discuss the existing available alternatives and present an up-to-date incremental coring system composed of a borer coupled to a hand-held drilling machine and a support attached to the tree which can collect incremental cores of 1.5 mm in diameter and over 1.0 m in length. The support ensures stability for the drill throughout the sampling process. This system is relatively lightweight and portable, offering field flexibility and suitability for sampling in remote locations. It provides a core sample of an appropriate diameter and amount for carrying out ring-width measurements, stable isotope and radiocarbon analyses on some of the large, older trees which are now being found in the tropics. We expect that this methodology will broaden the possibilities in the now-blossoming sub-field of tropical dendrochronology.