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Dielectric relaxation of colloidal particle suspensions at radio frequencies caused by surface conductance

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Blum,  Gernot
Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Maier,  Hannes
Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Sauer,  Friedrich A.
Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Schwan,  Herman P.
Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;
Bioengineering Department, School for Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States;
Radnor, Philadelphia, PA 19087, 99 Kynlyn Road, United States;

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Citation

Blum, G., Maier, H., Sauer, F. A., & Schwan, H. P. (1995). Dielectric relaxation of colloidal particle suspensions at radio frequencies caused by surface conductance. The Journal of Physical Chemistry, 99(2), 780-789. doi:10.1021/j100002a048.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-6425-D
Abstract
We measured the dielectric properties of suspensions of colloidal particles over a broad frequency range from 5 Hz to 13 MHz. The dielectric response is characterized by two distinct dispersions α and β that occur at low kilohertz and meghhertz frequencies, respectively. The α-response is identical with the counterion relaxation previously observed. The β-response is a Maxwell-Wagner effect resulting from the interaction of the suspended particles surrounded by a surface admittance element with the medium. The particle and surface admittances display relaxation only in the α-range. The β-effect is strong for particles suspended in an electrolyte of low salt concentration. It is weak for high concentrations and does not significantly contribute to the dielectric response of biological cell suspensions and tissues. The β-response permits calculation of the surface admittance at high frequencies. The results show that surface conductance and capacitance are independent of frequency above the α-range.