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C60: A host lattice for the intercalation of oxygen?

MPS-Authors
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Wohlers,  Michael
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Werner,  Harald
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Belz,  Thilo
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Rühle,  Thomas
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Schlögl,  Robert
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wohlers, M., Werner, H., Belz, T., Rühle, T., & Schlögl, R. (1997). C60: A host lattice for the intercalation of oxygen? Mikrochimica Acta, 125(1-4), 401-406. doi:10.1007/BF01246218.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-05FA-8
Abstract
The investigation of structural and electronic properties of the novel family of fullerenes depends on the existence of pure reference materials. Sublimation of the van-der Waals solids is a suitable purification method. Little attention has been paid to the question about the air stability of such sublimed samples in form of crystals or thin films. A combination of thermat desorption spectroscopy,
thermal analysis and diffuse reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy is used to show the extent to which oxygen from dry air is intercalated
into fullerenes and which detrimental reactivity occurs from attempts to thermally remove (,,anneal") air-exposed samples. The
conclusion is that any fullerene sample exposed to air will be transformed in part into a polymeric non-fullerene carbon upon thermal treatment to above 400 K irrespective of its initial purity.