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Book Chapter

Transport Proteins on Solid-Supported Membranes: From Basic Research to Drug Discovery

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Fendler,  Klaus
Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Kelety,  Béla
Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Bamberg,  Ernst
Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Fendler, K., Klingenberg, M., Leblanc, G., DePont, J. J. H., Kelety, B., Dörner, W., et al. (2004). Transport Proteins on Solid-Supported Membranes: From Basic Research to Drug Discovery. In V. M. Vladimir M. (Ed.), Springer Series on Chemical Sensors and Biosensors (Methods and Applications) (pp. 331-349). Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-29A3-1
Abstract
Solid-supported membranes (SSM) can be used as capacitive electrodes for the investigation of electrogenic transport proteins (ion pumps). Membrane fragments or liposomes that contain the transport protein are adsorbed on the SSM. The proteins are activated by supplying a substrate via a rapid solution exchange at the SSM. The charge translocations during the reaction cycle of the transport protein can be measured via the capacitance of the SSM. The SSM and the adsorbed membrane fragments or proteoliposomes represent a rugged structure that can be used in basic research and drug discovery. On the basis of a few examples we demonstrate how this technique can be applied to the investigation of the transport mechanism of membrane proteins. In addition, we present the application of the system in drug discovery. A sensor based on the SSM technology represents a promising system for the rapid screening of pharmaceutically relevant compounds for transport proteins.