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Measurement report: Photochemical production and loss rates of formaldehyde and ozone across Europe

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons256981

Nussbaumer,  Clara M.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons100898

Crowley,  John N.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons203248

Schuladen,  Jan
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101364

Williams,  Jonathan
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons127615

Hafermann,  Sascha
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101209

Reiffs,  Andreas
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons138568

Axinte,  Raoul
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons100983

Harder,  Hartwig
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101161

Novelli,  Anna
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons265416

Sala,  Katrin
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101122

Martinez,  Monica
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons230386

Mallik,  Chinmay
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons203250

Tomsche,  Laura
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101104

Lelieveld,  Jos
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons100935

Fischer,  Horst
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Nussbaumer, C. M., Crowley, J. N., Schuladen, J., Williams, J., Hafermann, S., Reiffs, A., et al. (2021). Measurement report: Photochemical production and loss rates of formaldehyde and ozone across Europe. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 21. doi:10.5194/acp-2021-694.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-2B8C-A
Abstract
Various atmospheric sources and sinks regulate the abundance of tropospheric formaldehyde (HCHO) which is an important trace gas impacting the HOx (≡ HO2 + OH) budget and the concentration of ozone (O3). In this study, we present the formation and destruction terms of ambient HCHO and O3 calculated from in-situ observations of various atmospheric trace gases measured at three different sites across Europe during summer time. These include a coastal site in Cyprus in the scope of the Cyprus Photochemistry Experiment (CYPHEX) in 2014, a mountain site in Southern Germany as part of the Hohenpeißenberg Photochemistry Experiment (HOPE) in 2012 and a forested site in Finland where measurements were performed during the Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles (HUMPPA) campaign in 2010. We show that at all three sites formaldehyde production from the OH oxidation of methane (CH4), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), isoprene (C5H8) and methanol (CH3OH) can almost completely balance the observed loss via photolysis, OH oxidation and dry deposition. Ozone chemistry is clearly controlled by nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) that includes O3 production from NO2 photolysis and O3 loss via the reaction with NO. Finally, we use the HCHO budget calculations to determine whether net ozone production is limited by the availability of VOCs (VOC limited regime) or NOx (NOx limited regime). At the mountain site in Germany O3 production is VOC limited, whereas it is NOx limited at the coastal site in Cyprus. The forested site in Finland is in the transition regime.