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Superconducting fluctuations observed far above Tc in the isotropic superconductor K3C60

MPS-Authors
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Jotzu,  G.
Quantum Condensed Matter Dynamics, Condensed Matter Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Meier,  G.
Dynamics and Transport in Nanostructures, Condensed Matter Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Cantaluppi,  A.
Quantum Condensed Matter Dynamics, Condensed Matter Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Cavalleri,  A.
Quantum Condensed Matter Dynamics, Condensed Matter Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford;

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2109.08679.pdf
(Preprint), 2MB

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Citation

Jotzu, G., Meier, G., Cantaluppi, A., Cavalleri, A., Pontiroli, D., Riccò, M., et al. (2021). Superconducting fluctuations observed far above Tc in the isotropic superconductor K3C60.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-2E08-C
Abstract
Alkali-doped fullerides are strongly correlated organic superconductors that exhibit high transition temperatures, exceptionally large critical magnetic fields and a number of other unusual properties. The proximity to a Mott insulating phase is thought to be a crucial ingredient of the underlying physics, and may also affect precursors of superconductivity in the normal state above T$_\text{c}$. We report on the observation of a sizeable magneto-thermoelectric (Nernst) effect in the normal state of K$_3$C$_{60}$, which displays the characteristics of superconducting fluctuations. The anomalous Nernst effect emerges from an ordinary quasiparticle background below a temperature of 80K, far above T$_\text{c}$ = 20K. At the lowest fields and close to T$_\text{c}$, the scaling of the effect is captured by a model based on Gaussian fluctuations. The temperature up to which we observe fluctuations is exceptionally high for a three-dimensional isotropic system, where fluctuation effects are usually suppressed.