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Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Significant Differences between Mouse Brain Formations in Expression of Proteins Involved in Neuronal Plasticity during Aging

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Gostomska-Pampuch,  Kinga
Mann, Matthias / Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

Wisniewski,  Jacek Roman
Mann, Matthias / Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Drulis-Fajdasz, D., Gostomska-Pampuch, K., Duda, P., Wisniewski, J. R., & Rakus, D. (2021). Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Significant Differences between Mouse Brain Formations in Expression of Proteins Involved in Neuronal Plasticity during Aging. Cells, 10(8): 2021. doi:10.3390/cells10082021.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-466F-D
Abstract
Aging is associated with a general decline in cognitive functions, which appears to be due to alterations in the amounts of proteins involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of proteins involved in neurotransmission in three brain regions, namely, the hippocampus, the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum, in mice aged 1 and 22 months, using the total protein approach technique. We demonstrate that although the titer of some proteins involved in neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity is affected by aging in a similar manner in all the studied brain formations, in fact, each of the formations represents its own mode of aging. Generally, the hippocampal and cortical proteomes are much more unstable during the lifetime than the cerebellar proteome. The data presented here provide a general picture of the effect of physiological aging on synaptic plasticity and might suggest potential drug targets for anti-aging therapies.