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Neural mechanisms of deliberate dishonesty: Dissociating deliberation from other control processes during dishonest behaviors

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Bellucci,  G
Department of Computational Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Sai, L., Bellucci, G., Wang, C., Fu, G., Camilleri, J., Eickhoff, S., et al. (2021). Neural mechanisms of deliberate dishonesty: Dissociating deliberation from other control processes during dishonest behaviors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 118(43), 1-3. doi:10.1073/pnas.2109208118.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-6088-1
Abstract
Numerous studies have sought proof of whether people are genuinely honest by testing whether cognitive control mechanisms are recruited during honest and dishonest behaviors. The underlying assumption is: Deliberate behaviors require cognitive control to inhibit intuitive responses. However, cognitive control during honest and dishonest behaviors can be required for other reasons than deliberation. Across 58 neuroimaging studies (1,211 subjects), we investigated different forms of honest and dishonest behaviors and demonstrated that many brain regions previously implicated in dishonesty may reflect more general cognitive mechanisms. We argue that the motivational/volitional dimension is central to deliberation and provide evidence that motivated dishonest behaviors recruit the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex. This work questions the view that cognitive control is a hallmark of dishonesty.