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Journal Article

Infrared Radiofluorescence (IR-RF) of K-Feldspar: An Interlaboratory Comparison

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Lauer,  Tobias
Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Richter,  Daniel
Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Murari, M. K., Kreutzer, S., Frouin, M., Friedrich, J., Lauer, T., Klasen, N., et al. (2021). Infrared Radiofluorescence (IR-RF) of K-Feldspar: An Interlaboratory Comparison. Geochronometria, 48(1), 105-120. doi:10.2478/geochr-2021-0007.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-B2AB-D
Abstract
Infrared Radiofluorescence (IR-RF) is a relatively new method for dosimetric dating of the depositional timing
of sediments. This contribution presents an interlaboratory comparison of IR-RF measurements of sedimentary
feldspar from eight laboratories. A comparison of the variability of instrumental background, bleaching, satura-
tion, and initial rise behaviour of the IR-RF signal was carried out. Two endmember samples, a naturally bleached
modern dune sand sample with a zero dose and a naturally saturated sample from a Triassic sandstone (~250 Ma),
were used for this interlaboratory comparison. The major findings of this study are that (1) the observed IR-RF
signal keeps decreasing beyond 4000 Gy, (2) the saturated sample gives an apparent palaeodose of 1265 ± 329 Gy
and (3) in most cases, the natural IR-RF signal of the modern analogue sample (resulting from natural bleaching) is
higher than the signal from laboratory-induced bleaching of 6 h, using a solar simulator (SLS). In other words, the
laboratory sample bleaching was unable to achieve the level of natural bleaching. The results of the investigations
are discussed in detail, along with possible explanations.