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Journal Article

Task-specific network interactions across key cognitive domains

MPS-Authors
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Williams,  Kathleen
Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Numssen,  Ole
Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Hartwigsen,  Gesa
Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Williams_2022.pdf
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Citation

Williams, K., Numssen, O., & Hartwigsen, G. (2022). Task-specific network interactions across key cognitive domains. Cerebral Cortex. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhab531.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-EF90-7
Abstract
Human cognition is organized in distributed networks in the brain. Although distinct specialized networks have been identified for different cognitive functions, previous work also emphasizes the overlap of key cognitive domains in higher level association areas. The majority of previous studies focused on network overlap and dissociation during resting states whereas task-related network interactions across cognitive domains remain largely unexplored. A better understanding of network overlap and dissociation during different cognitive tasks may elucidate flexible (re-)distribution of resources during human cognition. The present study addresses this issue by providing a broad characterization of large-scale network dynamics in three key cognitive domains. Combining prototypical tasks of the larger domains of attention, language, and social cognition with whole-brain multivariate activity and connectivity approaches, we provide a spatiotemporal characterization of multiple large-scale, overlapping networks that differentially interact across cognitive domains. We show that network activity and interactions increase with increased cognitive complexity across domains. Interaction patterns reveal a common core structure across domains as well as dissociable domain-specific network activity. The observed patterns of activation and deactivation of overlapping and strongly coupled networks provide insight beyond region-specific activity within a particular cognitive domain toward a network perspective approach across diverse key cognitive functions.