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Journal Article

Disentangling surface atomic motions from surface field effects in ultrafast low-energy electron diffraction

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons136098

Lee,  C.
Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Toronto;
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Center for Free-Electron Laser Science;

/persons/resource/persons136037

Marx,  A.
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Center for Free-Electron Laser Science;

/persons/resource/persons136033

Kassier,  G.
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Center for Free-Electron Laser Science;

External Resource
Fulltext (public)

s43246-022-00231-9.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)

43246_2022_231_MOESM1_ESM.pdf
(Supplementary material), 4MB

Citation

Lee, C., Marx, A., Kassier, G., & Miller, R. J. D. (2022). Disentangling surface atomic motions from surface field effects in ultrafast low-energy electron diffraction. Communications Materials, 3: 10. doi:10.1038/s43246-022-00231-9.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000A-01EA-D
Abstract
Ultrafast low-energy electron diffraction holds potential to provide atomic level details to the surface dynamics controlling processes from surface chemistry to exotic collective effects. Accessing the primary timescales requires subpicosecond excitation pulses to prepare the corresponding nonequilibrium state. The needed excitation for maximum contrast above background invariably leads to photoinduced electron emission with the creation of surface fields that affect diffraction and must be quantified to recover the key structural dynamics. Using 2 keV ultrashort low-energy electron bunches, we investigate this field effect on the ensuing electron distribution in projection imaging and diffraction as a function of excitation intensity. Using a structural model, we demonstrate a quantitative separation of the surface field effect on electron diffraction, enabling isolation of the structural dynamics of interest. Particle trajectory simulations provide insight into the correlation between geometrical characteristics of the charge separated region and the corresponding intensity modulation at the detector.