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Journal Article

NGN2 induces diverse neuron types from human pluripotency.

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Taverna,  Elena
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Treutlein,  Barbara
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Lin, H.-C., He, Z., Ebert, S., Schörnig, M., Santel, M., Nikolova, M. T., et al. (2021). NGN2 induces diverse neuron types from human pluripotency. Stem cell reports, 16(9), 2118-2127. doi:10.1016/j.stemcr.2021.07.006.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000A-0B9F-8
Abstract
Human neurons engineered from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through neurogenin 2 (NGN2) overexpression are widely used to study neuronal differentiation mechanisms and to model neurological diseases. However, the differentiation paths and heterogeneity of emerged neurons have not been fully explored. Here, we used single-cell transcriptomics to dissect the cell states that emerge during NGN2 overexpression across a time course from pluripotency to neuron functional maturation. We find a substantial molecular heterogeneity in the neuron types generated, with at least two populations that express genes associated with neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Neuron heterogeneity is observed across multiple iPSC clones and lines from different individuals. We find that neuron fate acquisition is sensitive to NGN2 expression level and the duration of NGN2-forced expression. Our data reveal that NGN2 dosage can regulate neuron fate acquisition, and that NGN2-iN heterogeneity can confound results that are sensitive to neuron type.