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Key Role of Equilibrium HONO Concentration over Soil in Quantifying Soil-Atmosphere HONO Fluxes

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Bao,  Fengxia
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Cheng,  Yafang
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons203111

Kuhn,  Uwe
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons204129

Li,  Guo
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Wang,  Wenjie
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Kratz,  Alexandra Maria
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Pöschl,  Ulrich
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101295

Su,  Hang
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Bao, F., Cheng, Y., Kuhn, U., Li, G., Wang, W., Kratz, A. M., et al. (2022). Key Role of Equilibrium HONO Concentration over Soil in Quantifying Soil-Atmosphere HONO Fluxes. Environmental Science & Technology, 56(4), 2204-2212. doi:10.1021/acs.est.1c06716.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000A-639F-4
Abstract
Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important component of the global nitrogen cycle and can regulate the atmospheric oxidative capacity. Soil is an important source of HONO. [HONO]*, the equilibrium gas-phase concentration over the aqueous solution of nitrous acid in the soil, has been suggested as a key parameter for quantifying soil fluxes of HONO. However, [HONO]* has not yet been well-validated and quantified. Here, we present a method to retrieve [HONO]* by conducting controlled dynamic chamber experiments with soil samples applied with different HONO concentrations at the chamber inlet. We show a bi-directional soil–atmosphere exchange of HONO and confirm the existence of [HONO]* over soil: when [HONO]* is higher than the atmospheric HONO concentration, HONO will be released from soil; otherwise, HONO will be deposited. We demonstrate that [HONO]* is a soil characteristic, which is independent of HONO concentrations in the chamber but varies with different soil water contents. We illustrate the robustness of using [HONO]* for quantifying soil fluxes of HONO, whereas the laboratory-determined chamber HONO fluxes can largely deviate from those in the real world for the same soil sample. This work advances the understanding of the soil–atmosphere exchange of HONO and the evaluation of its impact on the atmospheric oxidizing capacity.