English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Bottom-up assembly of synthetic cells with a DNA cytoskeleton

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons232747

Jahnke,  Kevin
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons274655

Huth,  Vanessa
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons118670

Mersdorf,  Ulrike
Department of Biomolecular Mechanisms, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons220391

Göpfrich,  Kerstin
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Jahnke, K., Huth, V., Mersdorf, U., Liu, N., & Göpfrich, K. (2022). Bottom-up assembly of synthetic cells with a DNA cytoskeleton. ACS Nano, 16(5), 7233-7241. doi:10.1021/acsnano.1c10703.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000A-8C5B-3
Abstract
Cytoskeletal elements, like actin and myosin, have been reconstituted inside lipid vesicles toward the vision to reconstruct cells from the bottom up. Here, we realize the de novo assembly of entirely artificial DNA-based cytoskeletons with programmed multifunctionality inside synthetic cells. Giant unilamellar lipid vesicles (GUVs) serve as cell-like compartments, in which the DNA cytoskeletons are repeatedly and reversibly assembled and disassembled with light using the cis–trans isomerization of an azobenzene moiety positioned in the DNA tiles. Importantly, we induced ordered bundling of hundreds of DNA filaments into more rigid structures with molecular crowders. We quantify and tune the persistence length of the bundled filaments to achieve the formation of ring-like cortical structures inside GUVs, resembling actin rings that form during cell division. Additionally, we show that DNA filaments can be programmably linked to the compartment periphery using cholesterol-tagged DNA as a linker. The linker concentration determines the degree of the cortex-like network formation, and we demonstrate that the DNA cortex-like network can deform GUVs from within. All in all, this showcases the potential of DNA nanotechnology to mimic the diverse functions of a cytoskeleton in synthetic cells.