English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Asymmetric mating behavior of isogamous budding yeast

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons254101

Anders,  Alexander
Microbial Networks, Department of Systems and Synthetic Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons254195

Colin,  Remy
Department of Systems and Synthetic Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons254116

Banderas,  Alvaro
Microbial Networks, Department of Systems and Synthetic Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;
Laboratoire Physico Chimie Curie, CNRS UMR168, Institut Curie, Paris, France.;

/persons/resource/persons254726

Sourjik,  Victor
Microbial Networks, Department of Systems and Synthetic Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;
Center for Synthetic Microbiology (SYNMIKRO);

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Anders, A., Colin, R., Banderas, A., & Sourjik, V. (2021). Asymmetric mating behavior of isogamous budding yeast. Science Advances, 7(24). doi:10.1126/sciadv.abf8404.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000A-A4B9-C
Abstract
Anisogamy, the size difference between small male and large female gametes, is known to enable selection for sexual dimorphism and behavioral differences between sexes. Nevertheless, even isogamous species exhibit molecular asymmetries between mating types, which are known to ensure their self-incompatibility. Here, we show that different properties of the pheromones secreted by the MATa and MATα mating types of budding yeast lead to asymmetry in their behavioral responses during mating in mixed haploid populations, which resemble behavioral asymmetries between gametes in anisogamous organisms. MATa behaves as a random searcher that is stimulated in proportion to the fraction of MATα partner cells within the population, whereas MATα behaves as a short-range directional distance sensor. Mathematical modeling suggests that the observed asymmetric responses can enhance efficiency of mating and might thus provide a selective advantage. Our results demonstrate that the emergence of asymmetric mating behavior did not require anisogamy-based sexual selection.