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Plant genetic archaeology: whole-genome sequencing reveals the pedigree of a classical trisomic line

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Salomé,  PA
Department Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Weigel,  D
Department Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Salomé, P., & Weigel, D. (2014). Plant genetic archaeology: whole-genome sequencing reveals the pedigree of a classical trisomic line. G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, 5(2), 253-259. doi:10.1534/g3.114.015156.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000A-A4E6-9
Abstract
The circadian oscillator is astonishingly robust to changes in the environment but also to genomic changes that alter the copy number of its components through genome duplication, gene duplication, and homeologous gene loss. While studying the potential effect of aneuploidy on the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock, we discovered that a line thought to be trisomic for chromosome 3 also bears the gi-1 mutation, resulting in a short period and late flowering. With the help of whole-genome sequencing, we uncovered the unexpected complexity of this trisomic stock's history, as its genome shows evidence of past outcrossing with another A. thaliana accession. Our study indicates that although historical aneuploidy lines exist and are available, it might be safer to generate new individuals and confirm their genomes and karyotypes by sequencing.