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Spectroscopy of Small and Large Biomolecular Ions in Helium-Nanodroplets

MPS-Authors
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Mucha,  Eike
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Thomas,  Daniel
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;
Department of Chemistry, University of Rhode Island;

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Lettow,  Maike
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Meijer,  Gerard
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Pagel,  Kevin
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Helden,  Gert von
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Mucha, E., Thomas, D., Lettow, M., Meijer, G., Pagel, K., & Helden, G. v. (2022). Spectroscopy of Small and Large Biomolecular Ions in Helium-Nanodroplets. In A. Slenczka, & J. P. Toennies (Eds.), Molecules in Superfluid Helium Nanodroplets Spectroscopy, Structure, and Dynamics (pp. 241-280). Berlin Heidelberg: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-94896-2_6.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000A-AC30-E
Abstract
A vast number of experiments have now shown that helium nanodroplets are an exemplary cryogenic matrix for spectroscopic investigations. The experimental techniques are well established and involve in most cases the pickup of evaporated neutral species by helium droplets. These techniques have been extended within our research group to enable nanodroplet pickup of anions or cations stored in an ion trap. By using electrospray ionization (ESI) in combination with modern mass spec- trometric methods to supply ions to the trap, an immense variety of mass-to-charge selected species can be doped into the droplets and spectroscopically investigated. We have combined this droplet doping methodology with IR action spectroscopy to investigate anions and cations ranging in size from a few atoms to proteins that consist of thousands of atoms. Herein, we show examples of small complexes of fluoride anions (F−) with CO2 and H2O and carbohydrate molecules. In the case of the small complexes, novel compounds could be identified, and quantum chemistry can in some instances quantitatively explain the results. For biologically relevant complex carbohydrate molecules, the IR spectra are highly diagnostic and allow the differentiation of species that would be difficult or impossible to identify by more conventional methods.