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Metabolism and chromatin: A dynamic duo that regulates development and ageing: Elucidating the metabolism-chromatin axis in bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cell fate decisions

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Pouikli,  A.
Tessarz – Chromatin and Ageing, Max Planck Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Max Planck Society;

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Tessarz,  P.
Tessarz – Chromatin and Ageing, Max Planck Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Pouikli, A., & Tessarz, P. (2021). Metabolism and chromatin: A dynamic duo that regulates development and ageing: Elucidating the metabolism-chromatin axis in bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cell fate decisions. Bioessays, 5(43), e2000273. doi:10.1002/bies.202000273.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000A-FA52-0
Abstract
Bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC) proliferation and lineage commitment are under the coordinated control of metabolism and epigenetics; the MSC niche contains low oxygen, which is an important determinant of the cellular metabolic state. In turn, metabolism drives stem cell fate decisions via alterations of the chromatin landscape. Due to the fundamental role of BM-MSCs in the development of adipose tissue, bones and cartilage, age-associated changes in metabolism and the epigenome perturb the balance between stem cell proliferation and differentiation leading to stem cell depletion, fat accumulation and bone-quality related diseases. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of the metabolism-chromatin interplay is crucial for maintaining the stem cell pool and delaying the development and progression of ageing. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of metabolism in stem cell identity and highlights the impact of the metabolic inputs on the epigenome, with regards to stemness and pluripotency.