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Controlled-alignment patterns of dipeptide micro- and nanofibers

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Danglad-Flores,  José Angél
Hans Riegler, Theorie & Bio-Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Eickelmann,  Stephan
Hans Riegler, Theorie & Bio-Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Riegler,  Hans
Hans Riegler, Theorie & Bio-Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Liu, X., Danglad-Flores, J. A., Eickelmann, S., Sun, B., Hao, J., Riegler, H., et al. (2022). Controlled-alignment patterns of dipeptide micro- and nanofibers. ACS Nano, 16(7), 10372-10382. doi:10.1021/acsnano.2c00443.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000A-B1B9-D
Abstract
Ordered assemblies of the peptide diphenylalanine (FF) are produced and deposited on planar substrates. The FF aggregate growth is achieved through precipitation from aqueous ammonia solutions induced by solvent evaporation. The applied dip-coating technique confines the FF assembly growth to a narrow zone near the three-phase contact. The growth was observed online by optical microscopy and was investigated systematically as a function of the process parameters. Depending on the external gas flow (to influence solvent evaporation), the withdrawal speed, the initial FF, and the initial ammonia concentrations, FF forms long, straight, and rigid microfibers and/or shorter, curved nanofibers. Under certain process conditions, the FF fibers can also aggregate into stripes. These can be deposited as large arrays of uniform stripes with regular widths and spacings. Scenarios leading to the various types of fibers and the stripe formation are presented and discussed in view of the experimental findings.