English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

BTZ-Derived Benzisothiazolinones with In Vitro Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons58578

Goddard,  Richard
Service Department Lehmann (EMR), Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons245985

Patzer,  Michael
Service Department Lehmann (EMR), Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Richter, A., Seidel, R. W., Goddard, R., Eckhardt, T., Lehmann, C., Dörner, J., et al. (2022). BTZ-Derived Benzisothiazolinones with In Vitro Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 13(8), 1302-1310. doi:10.1021/acsmedchemlett.2c00215.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000A-FF63-8
Abstract
8-Nitro-1,3-benzothiazin-4-ones (BTZs) are known as potent antitubercular agents. BTZ043 as one of the most advanced
compounds has reached clinical trials. The putative oxidation products of BTZ043, namely, the corresponding BTZ sulfoxide and
sulfone, were reported in this journal (Tiwari et al. ACS Med. Chem Lett. 2015, 6, 128−133). The molecular structures were later revised to the constitutionally isomeric benzisothiazolone and its 1-oxide, respectively. Here, we report two BTZ043-derived benzisothiazolinones (BITs) with in vitro activity against mycobacteria. The
constitutionally isomeric O-acyl benzisothiazol-3-ols, in contrast, show little or no antimycobacterial activity in vitro. The structures of the four compounds were investigated by X-ray crystallography and
NMR spectroscopy. Molecular covalent docking of the new compounds to Mycobacerium tuberculosis decaprenylphosphoryl-β-d-ribose 2′-epimerase (DprE1) suggests that the active BITs exert antimycobacterial activity through inhibition of DprE1 like BTZs.