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Long-term feeder-free culture of human pancreatic progenitors on fibronectin or matrix-free polymer potentiates β cell differentiation.

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Kim,  Yung Hae
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Grapin-Botton,  Anne
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Nakamura, A., Wong, Y. F., Venturato, A., Michaut, M., Venkateswaran, S., Santra, M., et al. (2022). Long-term feeder-free culture of human pancreatic progenitors on fibronectin or matrix-free polymer potentiates β cell differentiation. Stem cell reports, 17(5), 1215-1228. doi:10.1016/j.stemcr.2022.03.013.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000B-035B-C
Abstract
With the aim of producing β cells for replacement therapies to treat diabetes, several protocols have been developed to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells to β cells via pancreatic progenitors. While in vivo pancreatic progenitors expand throughout development, the in vitro protocols have been designed to make these cells progress as fast as possible to β cells. Here, we report on a protocol enabling a long-term expansion of human pancreatic progenitors in a defined medium on fibronectin, in the absence of feeder layers. Moreover, through a screening of a polymer library we identify a polymer that can replace fibronectin. Our experiments, comparing expanded progenitors to directly differentiated progenitors, show that the expanded progenitors differentiate more efficiently into glucose-responsive β cells and produce fewer glucagon-expressing cells. The ability to expand progenitors under defined conditions and cryopreserve them will provide flexibility in research and therapeutic production.