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Implications of a matter-antimatter mass asymmetry in Penning-trap experiments

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Lindner,  Manfred
Division Prof. Dr. Manfred Lindner, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Sen,  Manibrata
Division Prof. Dr. Manfred Lindner, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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2210.10819.pdf
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Citation

Cheng, T., Lindner, M., & Sen, M. (2022). Implications of a matter-antimatter mass asymmetry in Penning-trap experiments. arXiv, 2210.10819. doi:10.48550/arXiv.2210.10819.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000B-6CC6-D
Abstract
The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, being a local, unitary and
Lorentz-invariant quantum field theory, remains symmetric under the combined
action of Charge, Parity, and Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry. This automatically
implies that fundamental properties of particles and antiparticles should be
equal in magnitude. These fundamental tenets of the CPT principle have been put
to stringent tests in recent Penning-trap experiments, where the
matter-antimatter mass asymmetry has been measured. In light of these recent
advances, we compare the bounds arising on CPT invariance from kaon systems
with those from Penning-trap experiments. Using a simple yet powerful argument
of mass decomposition of hadrons, we show that bounds on quark-antiquark mass
differences from kaon oscillations are way beyond the reach of Penning-trap
experiments. We discuss possible reformulations of our understanding of the SM
in the case of a discovery of CPT violation by these precision experiments. We
find that in most cases, these extensions are quite exotic, and require
significant fine-tuning to preserve micro-causality.