English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

The EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase is necessary for the guidance of nasal retinal ganglion cell axons in vitro

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons282601

Walkenhorst,  J
Department Physical Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons283716

Dütting,  D
Department Physical Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons284104

Handwerker,  C
Department Physical Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons284106

Huai,  J
Department Physical Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons274493

Drescher,  U
Department Physical Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Walkenhorst, J., Dütting, D., Handwerker, C., Huai, J., Tanaka, H., & Drescher, U. (2000). The EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase is necessary for the guidance of nasal retinal ganglion cell axons in vitro. Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, 16(4), 365-375. doi:10.1006/mcne.2000.0878.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000B-B1F4-9
Abstract
The retinotectal projection serves as a model system for the study of topographic projections. It has been shown in the past few years that members of the Eph family are strongly involved in establishing this projection. The analysis so far has focused on a characterization of Ephrin ligands which are expressed in a gradient in both the tectum and the retina. Here we investigate the role of one of the multiple EphA receptors expressed on retinal ganglion cell axons, EphA4, which is uniformly expressed on nasal and temporal axons. We have adopted both a dominant negative approach and a method using neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in order to inactivate this receptor. The results of these in vitro experiments suggest that EphA4 is crucially involved in the repulsive guidance of nasal but not of temporal axons.