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Categorizing update mechanisms for graph-structured metapopulations

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Yagoobi,  Sedigeh
Department Evolutionary Theory (Traulsen), Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Sharma,  Nikhil
Department Evolutionary Theory (Traulsen), Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;
IMPRS for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Traulsen,  Arne       
Department Evolutionary Theory (Traulsen), Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Yagoobi, S., Sharma, N., & Traulsen, A. (2023). Categorizing update mechanisms for graph-structured metapopulations. Interface: Journal of the Royal Society, 20(200): 20220769. doi:10.1098/rsif.2022.0769.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000C-CBC8-E
Abstract
The structure of a population strongly influences its evolutionary dynamics. In various settings ranging from biology to social systems, individuals tend to interact more often with those present in their proximity and rarely with those far away. A common approach to model the structure of a population is evolutionary graph theory. In this framework, each graph node is occupied by a reproducing individual. The links connect these individuals to their neighbours. The offspring can be placed on neighbouring nodes, replacing the neighbours—or the progeny of its neighbours can replace a node during the course of ongoing evolutionary dynamics. Extending this theory by replacing single individuals with subpopulations at nodes yields a graph-structured metapopulation. The dynamics between the different local subpopulations is set by an update mechanism. There are many such update mechanisms. Here, we classify update mechanisms for structured metapopulations, which allows to find commonalities between past work and illustrate directions for further research and current gaps of investigation.