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PHANGS–JWST first results: multiwavelength view of feedback-driven bubbles (the Phantom Voids) across NGC 628

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Cao,  Yixian
Infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy, MPI for Extraterrestrial Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Liu,  Daizhong
Infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy, MPI for Extraterrestrial Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Barnes, A. T., Watkins, E. J., Meidt, S. E., Kreckel, K., Sormani, M. C., Treß, R. G., et al. (2023). PHANGS–JWST first results: multiwavelength view of feedback-driven bubbles (the Phantom Voids) across NGC 628. The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 944(2): L22. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aca7b9.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000D-0308-7
Abstract
We present a high-resolution view of bubbles within the Phantom Galaxy (NGC 628), a nearby (∼10 Mpc), star-forming (∼2 M yr−1), face-on (i ∼ 9°) grand-design spiral galaxy. With new data obtained as part of the Physics at High Angular resolution in Nearby GalaxieS (PHANGS)-JWST treasury program, we perform a detailed case study of two regions of interest, one of which contains the largest and most prominent bubble in the galaxy (the Phantom Void, over 1 kpc in diameter), and the other being a smaller region that may be the precursor to such a large bubble (the Precursor Phantom Void). When comparing to matched-resolution Hα observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we see that the ionized gas is brightest in the shells of both bubbles, and is coincident with the youngest (∼1 Myr) and most massive (∼105 M) stellar associations. We also find an older generation (∼20 Myr) of stellar associations is present within the bubble of the Phantom Void. From our kinematic analysis of the H I, H2 (CO), and H II gas across the Phantom Void, we infer a high expansion speed of around 15 to 50 km s−1. The large size and high expansion speed of the Phantom Void suggest that the driving mechanism is sustained stellar feedback due to multiple mechanisms, where early feedback first cleared a bubble (as we observe now in the Precursor Phantom Void), and since then supernovae have been exploding within the cavity and have accelerated the shell. Finally, comparison to simulations shows a striking resemblance to our JWST observations, and suggests that such large-scale, stellar-feedback-driven bubbles should be common within other galaxies.