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Sensitivity-enhanced magnetic resonance reveals hydrogen intermediates during active [Fe]-hydrogenase catalysis

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Gehl,  Manuel       
Department-Independent Research Group Microbial Protein Structure, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Huang,  Gangfeng
Department-Independent Research Group Microbial Protein Structure, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Shima,  Seigo       
Department-Independent Research Group Microbial Protein Structure, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Kaltschnee, L., Pravdivtsev, A. N., Gehl, M., Huang, G., Stoychev, G. L., Riplinger, C., et al. (2023). Sensitivity-enhanced magnetic resonance reveals hydrogen intermediates during active [Fe]-hydrogenase catalysis. bioRxiv: the preprint server for biology, 2023.05.10.540199.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000D-1BA5-B
Abstract
Molecular hydrogen (H2) is considered an eco-friendly future energy-carrier and an alternative to fossil fuel1 and thus, major efforts are directed towards identifying efficient and economical hydrogen catalysts.2,3 Efficient hydrogen catalysis is used by many microorganisms, some of them producing H2 from organic materials and others consuming it.4-6 To metabolize H2, these microorganisms use enzymes called hydrogenases.7,8 For the future development of efficient catalysts a detailed analysis of the catalytic mechanisms of such hydrogenases is required and existing analytical techniques could not provide a full understanding.9 Consequently, new analytical technologies are of utmost importance to unravel natures' blueprints for highly efficient hydrogen catalysts. Here, we introduce signal-enhanced or hyperpolarized, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study hydrogenases under turnover conditions. So far undiscovered hydrogen species of the catalytic cycle of [Fe]-hydrogenases, are revealed and thus, extend the knowledge regarding this class of enzymes. These findings pave new pathways for the exploration of novel hydrogen metabolisms in vivo. We furthermore envision that the results contribute to the rational design of future catalysts to solve energy challenges of our society.Competing Interest StatementThe authors have declared no competing interest.