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Design of an SFG-compatible uhv-high pressure reaction cell: Studies of CO and NO adsorption on Ni and NiO(100) by IR-vis sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

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Rupprechter,  Günther
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Dellwig,  Thilo
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Unterhalt,  Holger
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Freund,  Hans-Joachim       
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Rupprechter, G., Dellwig, T., Unterhalt, H., & Freund, H.-J. (2000). Design of an SFG-compatible uhv-high pressure reaction cell: Studies of CO and NO adsorption on Ni and NiO(100) by IR-vis sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. In A. Corma (Ed.), 12th International Congress on Catalysis (pp. 3131-3136). Amsterdam: Elsevier. doi:10.1016/S0167-2991(00)80503-0.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000D-9048-F
Abstract
Optical infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is one of the few surface-specific techniques that can operate in a pressure range from ultrahigh vacuum to ambient conditions. Due to its inherent surface sensitivity and pressure independence, SFG is particularly suited for in-situ studies of adsorbates or surface species at elevated pressure or during a catalytic reaction. In this progress report we describe the design of an SFG-compatible elevated pressure reactor that is attached to an ultrahigh vacuum (uhv) surface analysis chamber. After preparation and characterization in uhv, model catalysts can be transferred in vacuo into the reaction cell. The reactor is separated from the uhv chamber by an arrangement of differentially pumped teflon seals. In order to test our system, we studied the adsorption of CO and NO on Ni and NiO(100) surfaces at low coverages.