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A mathematician’s guide to plasmids: an introduction to plasmid biology for modellers

MPS-Authors
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Dewan,  Ian
Research Group Stochastic Evolutionary Dynamics (Uecker), Department Theoretical Biology (Traulsen), Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Uecker,  Hildegard
Research Group Stochastic Evolutionary Dynamics (Uecker), Department Theoretical Biology (Traulsen), Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Dewan, I., & Uecker, H. (2023). A mathematician’s guide to plasmids: an introduction to plasmid biology for modellers. Microbiology, 169: 001362. doi:10.1099/mic.0.001362.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000D-9555-B
Abstract
Plasmids, extrachromosomal DNA molecules commonly found in bacterial and archaeal cells, play an important role in bacterial genetics and evolution. Our understanding of plasmid biology has been furthered greatly by the development of mathematical models, and there are many questions about plasmids that models would be useful in answering. In this review, we present
an introductory, yet comprehensive, overview of the biology of plasmids suitable for modellers unfamiliar with plasmids who
want to get up to speed and to begin working on plasmid-related models. In addition to reviewing the diversity of plasmids and
the genes they carry, their key physiological functions, and interactions between plasmid and host, we also highlight selected
plasmid topics that may be of particular interest to modellers and areas where there is a particular need for theoretical development. The world of plasmids holds a great variety of subjects that will interest mathematical biologists, and introducing new
modellers to the subject will help to expand the existing body of plasmid theory.