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Automation and miniaturization of Golden Gate DNA assembly reactions using acoustic dispensers

MPS-Authors

Köbel,  Tania S.
Core Facility MPG MAXGenesys DNAfoundry, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Schindler,  Daniel       
Core Facility MPG MAXGenesys DNAfoundry, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Köbel, T. S., & Schindler, D. (2023). Automation and miniaturization of Golden Gate DNA assembly reactions using acoustic dispensers. arXiv, arXiv.2310.00325.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000D-D250-B
Abstract
Golden Gate cloning has become one of the most popular DNA assembly techniques. Its modular and hierarchical structure allows the construction of complex DNA fragments. Over time, Golden Gate cloning allows for the creation of a repository of reusable parts, reducing the cost of frequent sequence validation. However, as the number of reactions and fragments increases, so does the cost of consumables and the potential for human error. Typically, Golden Gate reactions are performed in volumes of 10 to 25 microlitre. Recent technological advances have led to the development of liquid handling robots that use sound to transfer liquids in the nL range from a source plate to a target plate. These acoustic dispensers have become particularly popular in the field of synthetic biology. The use of this technology allows miniaturization and parallelization of molecular reactions in a tip-free manner, making it sustainable by reducing plastic waste and reagent usage. Here, we provide a step-by-step protocol for performing and parallelizing Golden Gate cloning reactions in 1 microlitre total volume.