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Journal Article

Predictability alters information flow during action observation in human electrocorticographic activity

MPS-Authors
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Fries,  Pascal       
Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience in Cooperation with Max Planck Society, Max Planck Society;
Fries Lab, Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience in Cooperation with Max Planck Society, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Qin, C., Michon, F., Onuki, Y., Ishishita, Y., Otani, K., Kawai, K., et al. (2023). Predictability alters information flow during action observation in human electrocorticographic activity. Cell Reports, 42(11): 113432. doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2023.113432.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000E-02E4-E
Abstract
Highlights
• iEEG can track direction of information flow while viewing natural action sequences
• Embedding acts in predictable sequences increase premotor→parietal beta information flow
• The generated expectations suppress broadband gamma activity in occipital cortices
• This supports the notion of predictive coding in the action observation network

Summary
The action observation network (AON) has been extensively studied using short, isolated motor acts. How activity in the network is altered when these isolated acts are embedded in meaningful sequences of actions remains poorly understood. Here we utilized intracranial electrocorticography to characterize how the exchange of information across key nodes of the AON—the precentral, supramarginal, and visual cortices—is affected by such embedding and the resulting predictability. We found more top-down beta oscillation from precentral to supramarginal contacts during the observation of predictable actions in meaningful sequences compared to the same actions in randomized, and hence less predictable, order. In addition, we find that expectations enabled by the embedding lead to a suppression of bottom-up visual responses in the high-gamma range in visual areas. These results, in line with predictive coding, inform how nodes of the AON integrate information to process the actions of others.