English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Mass Balance Imaging: A Phase Portrait Analysis for Characterizing Growth Kinetics of Biomolecular Condensates.

MPS-Authors
/cone/persons/resource/persons263352

Yan,  Victoria T
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

/cone/persons/resource/persons145692

Grill,  Stephan W.
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

/cone/persons/resource/persons231941

Narayanan,  Arjun
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Geisler, J., Yan, V. T., Grill, S. W., & Narayanan, A. (2023). Mass Balance Imaging: A Phase Portrait Analysis for Characterizing Growth Kinetics of Biomolecular Condensates. Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), 2563, 413-424. doi:10.1007/978-1-0716-2663-4_21.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000E-AB12-D
Abstract
Biomolecular condensation has emerged as a key organizing principle governing the formation of membraneless cellular assemblies. Revealing the mechanism of formation of biomolecular condensates requires the quantitative examination of their growth kinetics. Here, we introduce mass balance imaging (MBI) as a general method to study compositional growth dynamics based on fluorescent images of multicomponent clusters. MBI allows the visualization and measurement of composition-dependent growth rates of biomolecular condensates and other assemblies. We provide a computational pipeline and demonstrate the applicability of our method by investigating cortical assemblies containing N-WASP (WSP-1) and F-actin that appear during oocyte cortex activation in C. elegans. In general, the method can be broadly implemented to identify interactions that underlie growth kinetics of multicomponent assemblies in vivo and in vitro.