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Extracellular lipidosomes containing lipid droplets and mitochondria are released during melanoma cell division.

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Wilsch-Bräuninger,  Michaela
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Fargeas,  Christine A.
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Corbeil,  Denis
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Karbanová, J., Deniz, I. A., Wilsch-Bräuninger, M., Couto, R. A. d. S., Fargeas, C. A., Santos, M. F., et al. (2024). Extracellular lipidosomes containing lipid droplets and mitochondria are released during melanoma cell division. Cell communication and signaling: CCS, 22(1): 57. doi:10.1186/s12964-024-01471-7.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-000F-15E0-C
Abstract
The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide. Since metastatic melanoma is highly aggressive, it is important to decipher all the biological aspects of melanoma cells. In this context, we have previously shown that metastatic FEMX-I melanoma cells release small (< 150 nm) extracellular vesicles (EVs) known as exosomes and ectosomes containing the stem (and cancer stem) cell antigenic marker CD133. EVs play an important role in intercellular communication, which could have a micro-environmental impact on surrounding tissues.