English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Robotic mechanical wounding (MecWorm) versus herbivore-induced responses: early signaling and volatile emission in Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.)

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons4012

Leitner,  Margit
Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Prof. Dr. W. Boland, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons4052

Mithöfer,  Axel
Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Prof. Dr. W. Boland, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons3812

Boland,  Wilhelm
Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Prof. Dr. W. Boland, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
Citation

Bricchi, I., Leitner, M., Foti, M., Mithöfer, A., Boland, W., & Maffei, M. (2010). Robotic mechanical wounding (MecWorm) versus herbivore-induced responses: early signaling and volatile emission in Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.). Planta, 232(3), 719-729. doi:10.1007/s00425-010-1203-0.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-B86A-B
Abstract
Insect herbivory on plants is a complex incident consisting of at least two different aspects, mechanical damage and chemical factors. Only the combination of both is able to induce the respective plant defenses. Thus, diverse plant species emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in response to herbivory (HW), whereas mechanical damage inflicted as single wounding event (MD) does not induce increased VOC emissions. In contrast, a robotic worm (MecWorm, MW) allowed demonstrating that continuous mechanical damage is sufficient to induce volatile emission in Lima bean. However, the induced VOC blends remain characteristic for the respective stimulus. In order to identify putative differences in plant signaling leading to defenses, we compared time courses of early signals induced by wounding in Lima bean. Neither MD nor MW alone was able to induce plasma membrane (V m) depolarization, as observed after Spodoptera littoralis HW, but V m depolarization occurred in both treatments when used in combination with herbivore-derived oral secretions. A significant increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations was observed only after HW, whereas MD and MW did not affect this second messenger. H2O2 was generated within 2–3 h after leaf damage by HW and MW, whereas MD induced only half of the H2O2 levels compared to the other treatments. Both HW and MW induced a marked accumulation of NO, but with distinct temporal patterns. NO production after MD followed the same trend but reached significantly lower values. The results indicate that chemical signals from the herbivores are responsible for the induction of the earliest signaling events. These changes appear to be characteristic for the reaction to herbivory.