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Neural correlates of intentional communication

MPS-Authors
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De Ruiter,  Jan Peter
Faculty for Linguistics and Literary Studies, Bielefeld University, Germany ;
Language and Cognition Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Hagoort,  Peter
Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, External Organizations;
Neurobiology of Language Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Radboud University Nijmegen;
Interactional Foundations of Language, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Levinson,  Stephen C.
Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, External Organizations;
Language and Cognition Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Radboud University Nijmegen;
Interactional Foundations of Language, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Noordzij_fnins-04-00188-1.pdf
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Citation

Noordzij, M. L., Newman-Norlund, S. E., De Ruiter, J. P., Hagoort, P., Levinson, S. C., & Toni, I. (2010). Neural correlates of intentional communication. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 4, E188. doi:10.3389/fnins.2010.00188.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-C839-9
Abstract
We know a great deal about the neurophysiological mechanisms supporting instrumental actions, i.e. actions designed to alter the physical state of the environment. In contrast, little is known about our ability to select communicative actions, i.e. actions directly designed to modify the mental state of another agent. We have recently provided novel empirical evidence for a mechanism in which a communicator selects his actions on the basis of a prediction of the communicative intentions that an addressee is most likely to attribute to those actions. The main novelty of those finding was that this prediction of intention recognition is cerebrally implemented within the intention recognition system of the communicator, is modulated by the ambiguity in meaning of the communicative acts, and not by their sensorimotor complexity. The characteristics of this predictive mechanism support the notion that human communicative abilities are distinct from both sensorimotor and linguistic processes.