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Journal Article

A genetic system to assess in vivo the functions of histones and histone modifications in higher eukaryotes.

MPS-Authors
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Günesdogan,  U.
Department of Molecular Developmental Biology, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Jäckle,  H.
Department of Molecular Developmental Biology, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Herzig,  A.
Department of Molecular Developmental Biology, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
Fulltext (public)

510640.pdf
(Publisher version), 0B

Supplementary Material (public)

587620-Suppl.pdf
(Supplementary material), 13MB

Citation

Günesdogan, U., Jäckle, H., & Herzig, A. (2010). A genetic system to assess in vivo the functions of histones and histone modifications in higher eukaryotes. EMBO Reports, 11(10), 772-776. doi:10.1038/embor.2010.124.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-D520-7
Abstract
Despite the fundamental role of canonical histones in nucleosome structure, there is no experimental system for higher eukaryotes in which basic questions about histone function can be directly addressed. We developed a new genetic tool for Drosophila melanogaster in which the canonical histone complement can be replaced with multiple copies of experimentally modified histone transgenes. This new histone‐replacement system provides a well‐defined and direct cellular assay system for histone function with which to critically test models in chromatin biology dealing with chromatin assembly, variant histone functions and the biological significance of distinct histone modifications in a multicellular organism.