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Journal Article

SAP18 promotes Krüppel-dependent transcriptional repression by enhancer-specific histone deacetylation.

MPS-Authors
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Matyash,  A.
Department of Molecular Developmental Biology, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Urlaub,  H.
Research Group of Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Jäckle,  H.
Department of Molecular Developmental Biology, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

412112.pdf
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Supplementary Material (public)

588207-Suppl.doc
(Supplementary material), 410KB

Citation

Matyash, A., Singh, S., Hanes, S. D., Urlaub, H., & Jäckle, H. (2009). SAP18 promotes Krüppel-dependent transcriptional repression by enhancer-specific histone deacetylation. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 284(5), 3012-3020. doi:10.1074/jbc.M806163200.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-D90A-6
Abstract
Body pattern formation during early embryogenesis of Drosophila melanogaster relies on a zygotic cascade of spatially restricted transcription factor activities. The gap gene Krüppel ranks at the top level of this cascade. It encodes a C2H2 zinc finger protein that interacts directly with cis-acting stripe enhancer elements of pair rule genes, such as even skipped and hairy, at the next level of the gene hierarchy. Krüppel mediates their transcriptional repression by direct association with the corepressor Drosophila C terminus-binding protein (dCtBP). However, for some Krüppel target genes, deletion of the dCtBP-binding sites does not abolish repression, implying a dCtBP-independent mode of repression. We identified Krüppel-binding proteins by mass spectrometry and found that SAP18 can both associate with Krüppel and support Krüppel-dependent repression. Genetic interaction studies combined with pharmacological and biochemical approaches suggest a site-specific mechanism of Krüppel-dependent gene silencing. The results suggest that Krüppel tethers the SAP18 bound histone deacetylase complex 1 at distinct enhancer elements, which causes repression via histone H3 deacetylation.