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Local changes in the catalytic site of mammalian histidine decarboxylase can affect its global conformation and stability

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Subramaniam,  V.
Department of Molecular Biology, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Rodriguez-Caso, C., Rodriguez-Agudo, D., Moya-Garcia, A. A., Fajardo, I., Medina, M. A., Subramaniam, V., et al. (2003). Local changes in the catalytic site of mammalian histidine decarboxylase can affect its global conformation and stability. European Journal of Biochemistry, 270, 4376-4387. Retrieved from http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/118830151/PDFSTART.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-F1CE-1
Abstract
Mature, active mammalian histidine decarboxylase is a dimeric enzyme of carboxy-truncated monomers ( ~53 kDa). By using a biocomputational approach, we have generated a three-dimensional model of a recombinant 1/512 fragment of the rat enzyme, which shows kinetic constants similar to those of the mature enzyme purified from rodent tissues. This model, together with previous spectroscopic data, allowed us to postulate that the occupation of the catalytic center by the natural substrate, or by substrate-analogs, would induce remarkable changes in the conformation of the intact holoenzyme.To investigate the proposed conformational changes during catalysis, we have carried out electrophoretic, chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses of purified recombinant rat 1/512 histidine decarboxylase in the presence of the natural substrate or substrate-analogs. Our results suggest that local changes in the catalytic site indeed affect the global conformation and stability of the dimeric protein.These results provide insights for new alternatives to inhibit histamine production efficiently in vivo.