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Fluorescence Correlation Microscopy of cells in the presence of autofluorescence

MPG-Autoren
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Brock,  R.
Department of Molecular Biology, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Jovin,  T. M.
Department of Molecular Biology, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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600747.pdf
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Zitation

Brock, R., Hink, M. A., & Jovin, T. M. (1998). Fluorescence Correlation Microscopy of cells in the presence of autofluorescence. Biophysical Journal, 75, 2547-2557.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-FC6E-E
Zusammenfassung
Fluorescence correlation microscopy (FCM), the combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and digital microscopy (Brock and Jovin, 1998. Cell. Mol. Biol. 44:847-856), has been implemented for measuring molecular diffusion and association in living cells with explicit consideration of autocorrelations arising from autofluorescence. Autofluorescence excited at 532 nm colocalizes with mitochondria, has flavin-like spectral characteristics, exhibits relaxation times characteristic for the diffusion of high-molecular-weight proteins, and depends on the incubation conditions of the cells. These time- and location-dependent properties preclude the assignment of universal background parameters. The lower limit for detection of microinjected dextran molecules labeled with the carboxymethylindocyanine dye Cy3 was a few thousand molecules per cell, and the diffusion constant of 1.7 x 10(-7) cm2/s agreed well with values measured with other methods. Based on the fluorescence signal per molecule (fpm) and the molecule number derived from autocorrelation analysis, a new method is devised to define intracellular association states. We conclude that FCM is a powerful, noninvasive method for probing molecular interactions in femtoliter volume elements within defined subcellular locations in living cells.