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Journal Article

0.3-second FLASH MRI of the human heart.

MPS-Authors
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Frahm,  J.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Merboldt,  K. D.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Bruhn,  H.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Gyngell,  M. L.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Haenicke,  W.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Chien,  D.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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603081.pdf
(Publisher version), 537KB

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Citation

Frahm, J., Merboldt, K. D., Bruhn, H., Gyngell, M. L., Haenicke, W., & Chien, D. (1990). 0.3-second FLASH MRI of the human heart. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 13(1), 150-157. doi:10.1002/mrm.1910130114.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-0E86-2
Abstract
Flow-suppressed FLASH MR images of the human heart have been recorded within a measuring time of 0.3 s using a 2.0-T whole-body research system (Siemens Magnetom) equipped with a conventional 10 mT m-1 gradient system. Subsecond imaging times have been achieved by reducing the repetition time to TR = 4.8 ms and by lowering the spatial resolution to 64 X 128 measured data points. The flip angle of the slice-selective radiofrequency (rf) pulses was adjusted to 10 degrees. Cardiac chambers, ventricular walls, and valves are well delineated in images from a single cardiac cycle using a field of 250 mm and a slice thickness of 8 mm. No motion artifacts were observed as a consequence of the short echo time of TE = 2.8 ms. Distinction between flowing blood and solid structures has been achieved by spatial presaturation of adjacent slices using two slice-selective 90 degrees rf pulses preceding the entire imaging sequence.