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Conference Paper

Language-sites: Accessing and presenting language resources via geographic information systems

MPS-Authors
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Van Uytvanck,  Dieter
Technical Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Dukers,  Alex
Technical Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Ringersma,  Jacquelijn
Technical Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Trilsbeek,  Paul
Technical Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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VanUytvanck_2008_language.pdf
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Citation

Van Uytvanck, D., Dukers, A., Ringersma, J., & Trilsbeek, P. (2008). Language-sites: Accessing and presenting language resources via geographic information systems. In N. Calzolari, K. Choukri, B. Maegaard, J. Mariani, J. Odijk, S. Piperidis, et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2008). Paris: European Language Resources Association (ELRA).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-1F8D-9
Abstract
The emerging area of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has proven to add an interesting dimension to many research projects. Within the language-sites initiative we have brought together a broad range of links to digital language corpora and resources. Via Google Earth's visually appealing 3D-interface users can spin the globe, zoom into an area they are interested in and access directly the relevant language resources. This paper focuses on several ways of relating the map and the online data (lexica, annotations, multimedia recordings, etc.). Furthermore, we discuss some of the implementation choices that have been made, including future challenges. In addition, we show how scholars (both linguists and anthropologists) are using GIS tools to fulfill their specific research needs by making use of practical examples. This illustrates how both scientists and the general public can benefit from geography-based access to digital language data