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A Simon-effect with stationary moving stimuli

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Bosbach,  Simone
Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Prinz,  Wolfgang
Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Kerzel,  Dirk
Research Group Infant Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Bosbach, S., Prinz, W., & Kerzel, D. (2004). A Simon-effect with stationary moving stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 30(1), 39-55. doi:10.1037/0096-1523.30.1.39.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-9E13-1
Abstract
To clarify whether motion information per se has a separable influence on action control, the authors investigated whether irrelevant direction of motion of stimuli whose overall position was constant over time would affect manual left-right responses (i.e., reveal a motion-based Simon effect). In Experiments 1 and 2, significant Simon effects were obtained for sine-wave gratings moving in a stationary Gaussian window. In Experiment 3, a direction-based Simon effect with random-dot patterns was replicated, except that the perceived direction of motion was based on the displacement of single elements. Experiments 4 and 5 studied motion-based Simon effects to point-light figures that walked in place--displays requiring high-level analysis of global shape and local motion. Motion-based Simon effects occurred when the displays could be interpreted as an upright human walker, showing that a high-level representation of motion direction mediated the effects. Thus, the present study establishes links between high-level motion perception and action.