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Characterization of middle cerebral artery occlusion infarct development in the rat using fast nuclear magnetic resonance proton spectroscopic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging

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Norris,  David G.
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Norris, D. G., Hoehn-Berlage, M., Dreher, W., Kohno, K., Busch, E., & Schmitz, B. (1998). Characterization of middle cerebral artery occlusion infarct development in the rat using fast nuclear magnetic resonance proton spectroscopic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 18(7), 749-757. doi:10.1097/00004647-199807000-00006.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-A3B4-1
Abstract
A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat is presented. Experiments were performed on seven animals before and after occlusion, which occurred in situ. The emphasis in this study was on evaluating rapid proton spectroscopic imaging. Data were acquired with experimental durations of between 4 and 15 minutes for a 32 by 32 spatial matrix, with 64 spectroscopic data points per spatial element. The spectroscopic data were interleaved with diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance water images of the same slice. The study was terminated at about 6 hours after occlusion. The brains were then frozen in liquid nitrogen for biochemical imaging. The results showed that the signal from N-acetyl aspartate decreased and that of lactate increased within the infarcted region. The temporal course of these intensity changes varied between animals. Nineteen cortical spreading depressions (CSD) were observed by electrophysiologic monitoring during the experiments. Of these, 11 could be unambiguously detected in the lactate images, and a further 3 were on the threshold of detectability. As only a single slice could be examined, it is possible that the centers of depression for the remaining 6 CSD were outside the slice. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of the measurement of CSD using proton spectroscopic imaging. Thus, it is shown that this method is valuable not only in following the continuous evolution of proton metabolites with a good spatial and temporal resolution, but also in observing transient phenomena which are believed to play an important role in the expansion of the infarcted territory.