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Dissociation of memory retrieval and search processes: An event-related fMRI study

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Pollmann,  Stefan
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Wiggins,  Christopher J.
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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von Cramon,  D. Yves
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Pollmann, S., Zysset, S., Wiggins, C. J., & von Cramon, D. Y. (2000). Dissociation of memory retrieval and search processes: An event-related fMRI study. Microscopy Research and Technique, 51(1), 29-38. doi:10.1002/1097-0029(20001001)51:1<29:AID-JEMT3>3.0.CO;2-W.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-AC78-E
Abstract
A cognitive task can often be subdivided into several subprocesses, which follow a specific temporal order. Here, we report an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment on memory search, in which the temporal onset of search in primary memory was varied relative to retrieval from secondary memory. Furthermore, previous behavioral studies demonstrated that search times in primary memory depend on the number of items in a memory set, whereas retrieval from secondary memory is a set-size independent process. We analyzed the dependency of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD)-response on the temporal onset of memory search on the one hand and on memory set size on the other hand to differentiate the contribution of retrieval from secondary memory, maintenance in primary memory, item search in primary memory, and response-related processes. The timing of activation followed cue presentation bilaterally in the middle frontal gyri (Brodmann area (BA) 9,46) and the inferior parts of the precentral gyri (BA6). In all other regions of interest (ROI), supplementary motor area (SMA), posterior parietal cortex, antero-superior insula, and primary motor cortex, the onset of activation was delayed with delayed probe presentation, ruling out participation in retrieval from secondary memory. The amplitude of the BOLD-response increased with increasing memory set size in all ROI except primary motor cortex and left posterior parietal cortex. All areas with cue-associated BOLD onset, suggesting involvement in retrieval, showed prolonged BOLD activation, suggesting that they also support maintenance of the retrieved information.