English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Intention-based and stimulus-based mechanisms in action selection

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons20087

Waszak,  Florian
Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons20086

Wascher,  Edmund
Max Planck Research Group Cognitive Psychophysiology of Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19767

Keller,  Peter E.
Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19783

Koch,  Iring
Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19533

Aschersleben,  Gisa
Research Group Infant Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19932

Prinz,  Wolfgang
Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Waszak, F., Wascher, E., Keller, P. E., Koch, I., Aschersleben, G., Rosenbaum, D. A., et al. (2005). Intention-based and stimulus-based mechanisms in action selection. Experimental Brain Research, 162(3), 346-356. doi:10.1007/s00221-004-2183-8.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-BE43-8
Abstract
Human actions can be classified as being either more stimulus-based or more intention-based. According to the ideomotor framework of action control, intention-based actions primarily refer to anticipated action effects (in other words response-stimulus [R-S] bindings), whereas stimulus-based actions are commonly assumed to be more strongly determined by stimulus-response [S-R] bindings. We explored differences in the functional signatures of both modes of action control in a temporal bisection task. Participants either performed a choice response by pressing one out of two keys in response to a preceding stimulus (stimulus-based action), or pressed one out of two keys to produce the next stimulus (intention-based action). In line with the ideomotor framework, we found intention-based actions to be shifted in time towards their anticipated effects (the next stimulus), whereas stimulus-based actions were shifted towards their preceding stimulus. Event-related potentials (ERPs) in the EEG revealed marked differences in action preparation for the two tasks. The data as a whole provide converging evidence for functional differences in the selection of motor actions as a function of their triggering conditions, and support the notion of two different modes of action selection, one being exogenous or mainly stimulus-driven, the other being endogenous or mainly intention-driven.