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Manipulation of working memory information is impaired in Parkinson's disease and related to working memory capacity

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Bublak,  Peter
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Müller,  Ulrich
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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von Cramon,  D. Yves
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Bublak, P., Müller, U., Grön, G., Reuter, M., & von Cramon, D. Y. (2002). Manipulation of working memory information is impaired in Parkinson's disease and related to working memory capacity. Neuropsychology, 16(4), 577-590. doi:10.1037/0894-4105.16.4.577.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-C51B-7
Abstract
It has been suggested that in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), difficulties in the manipulation of information, which result in problems in executive tasks, are related to a reduction of working memory capacity (J. D. E. Gabrieli, J. Singh, G. T. Stebbins, & C. G. Goetz, 1996). The present study selectively varied the manipulation demand irrespective of the maintenance requirement. In a group of 14 PD patients, performance declined overproportionally with the increasing task demand and was significantly correlated with a measure of working memory capacity. These results suggest that the complexity of working memory processing may decisively contribute to the exhaustion of resources in PD patients. Increasing complexity may either affect their manipulation ability directly or impede the management of inhibitory control requirements inherent to the task.