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Morphometry demonstrates loss of cortical thickness in cerebral microangiopathy

MPS-Authors
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Preul,  Christoph
Department Cognitive Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Lohmann,  Gabriele
Department Cognitive Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Hund-Georgiadis,  Margret
Department Cognitive Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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von Cramon,  D. Yves
Department Cognitive Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Preul, C., Lohmann, G., Hund-Georgiadis, M., Guthke, T., & von Cramon, D. Y. (2005). Morphometry demonstrates loss of cortical thickness in cerebral microangiopathy. Journal of Neurology, 252(4), 441-447. doi:10.1007/s00415-005-0671-9.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-C7FB-0
Abstract
Objective To evaluate the role of MR morphometry in the characterization of cerebral microangiopathy (CMA) in relation to clinical and neuropsychological impairment. Subjects and Methods 3D MR images of 27 patients and 27 age–matched controls were morphometrically analysed for regional thickness. The normalized values were related to the patients’ clinical and neuropsychological scores. The patients were categorised according to the amount of structural MR signal changes. A ventricle index reflecting internal atrophy was related to MR morphology and cortical thickness as an indicator for external atrophy. Results Cortical thickness was significantly reduced in the patients group (3.03mm ± 0.26 vs. 3.22mm ± 0.13 in controls, p = 0.001). The severest loss of cortical thickness occurred in severe CMA. Internal and external atrophy evolved in parallel and both showed a significant relationship with structural MR–abnormalities (p < 0.05; r = –0.7; r = 0.67; r = –0.74, respectively). Neuropsychological performance correlated strongly with the loss of cortical thickness. Conclusions Cortical thickness was identified as the most sensitive parameter to characterize CMA. A strong correlation was found of morphometric parameters to the severity of CMA based on a score derived from T2–weighted MRI. The degree of cortical atrophy was directly related to the degree of neuropsychological impairment. Our findings suggest that the cortical thickness is a valid marker in the structural and clinical characterization of CMA.