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Regional differences of fMR signal changes induced by hyperventilation: Comparison between SE-EPI and GE-EPI at 3-T

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Norris,  David G.
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Zysset,  Stefan
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Mildner,  Toralf
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Naganawa, S., Norris, D. G., Zysset, S., & Mildner, T. (2002). Regional differences of fMR signal changes induced by hyperventilation: Comparison between SE-EPI and GE-EPI at 3-T. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 15(1), 23-30. doi:10.1002/jmri.10028.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-D531-5
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate whether reproducible signal change of brain tissues by hyperventilation (HV) can be seen on spin-echo (SE)-echo planar imaging (EPI) at 3-T and to examine the sensitivity of SE-EPI for measuring vascular reactivity in regions of the brain, such as the hippocampal formation, that are difficult to visualize with gradient-echo (GE)-EPI due to susceptibility artifacts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six healthy human subjects performed a voluntary HV task. The task design was as follows: two minutes normal breathing (rest) followed by two minutes HV, giving a basic four-minute block that was repeated three times for a total scan time of 12 minutes for one run. Each subject performed the run both for SE-EPI and GE-EPI. Statistical analysis was performed to detect the area with significant cerebrovascular reactivity. The percentage signal change was also obtained for each cerebral region. RESULTS: Both GE-EPI and SE-EPI showed globally significant signal decreases in the cerebral cortex. In GE-EPI, the frontal cortex showed a larger signal decrease than the other gray matter tissues (P < 0.05). In SE-EPI, the differences among gray matter tissues except for the hippocampal formation were not significant. The hippocampal formation showed the largest signal change (P < 0.05) in SE-EPI, but no significant signal change was observed in GE-EPI due to the presence of susceptibility artifacts. CONCLUSION: HV using SE-EPI at 3-T provides robust and reproducible signal decreases and may make the evaluation of the vascular reactivity in hippocampal formation feasible.