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Retrieval of long and short lists from long term memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study with human subjects

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Zysset,  Stefan
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Müller,  Karsten
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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von Cramon,  D. Yves
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Zysset, S., Müller, K., Lehmann, C., Thöne-Otto, A. I. T., & von Cramon, D. Y. (2001). Retrieval of long and short lists from long term memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study with human subjects. Neuroscience Letters, 314(1-2), 1-4. doi:10.1016/S0304-3940(01)02175-9.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-D642-8
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that reaction time in an item-recognition task with both short and long lists is a quadratic function of list length. This suggests that either different memory retrieval processes are implied for short and long lists or an adaptive process is involved. An event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study with nine subjects and list lengths varying between 3 and 18 words was conducted to identify the underlying neuronal structures of retrieval from long and short lists. For the retrieval and processing of word-lists a single fronto-parietal network, including premotor, left prefrontal, left precuneal and left parietal regions, was activated. With increasing list length, no additional regions became involved in retrieving information from long-term memory, suggesting that not necessarily different, but highly adaptive retrieval processes are involved.