English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

The understanding of own and others' actions during infancy: "You-like-me" or "Me-like-you"

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons19697

Hauf,  Petra
Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19932

Prinz,  Wolfgang
Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Hauf, P., & Prinz, W. (2005). The understanding of own and others' actions during infancy: "You-like-me" or "Me-like-you". Interaction studies, 6(3), 429-445. doi:10.1075/bct.4.17hau.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-E4BA-1
Abstract
Developmental psychologists assume that infants understand other persons’ actions after and because they understand their own (“Like-me” perspective). However, there is another possibility as well, namely that infants come to understand their own actions after and because they understand other persons’ actions (“Like-you” perspective). We reviewed infant research on the influence of perceived actions on self-performed actions as well as the reverse. Furthermore, we investigated the interplay between both aspects of action understanding by means of a sequence variation. The results show the impact of agentive experience for action understanding, but not the reverse. The question whether infants’ perceived and to-be-produced actions share common representations of the perceptual and the motor system is discussed in relation to its implications for the social making of minds.